Nimues Obsessions

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Jul 5
Skadi, in Norse Mythology, the giant wife of the sea god Njörd. In order to avenge the death of her father, the giant Thiazi, Skadi took up arms and went to attack the rival tribe of the gods (the Aesir) in Asgard, home of the gods. The Aesir, wanting to appease her anger, offered her the choice of one of their number for a husband, with the stipulation that she choose a god by his legs (or feet) alone. She chose Njord, thinking that he was the fair god Balder; their marriage failed because Njord preferred to live by the sea, and Skadi was happier in her father’s home in the mountains (Thrymheim).
"Hateful for me are the mountains,I was not long there,only nine nights.The howling of the wolvessounded ugly to meafter the song of the swans.”
Skadi responded:
"Sleep I could noton the sea bedsfor the screeching of the bird.That gull wakes me when from the wide sea he comes each morning.”
In some sources, Skadi was known as the goddess of snowshoes. Another tradition relates that Skadi later married the god Odin and bore him sons. And yet another that she after that married Ull. The god of justice and dueling.
In chapter 8 of the Heimskringla book Ynglinga saga, Skadi appears in an euhumerized account. This account details that Skadi had once married Njord but that she would not have sex with him, and that later Skadi married Odin. Skadi and Odin had “many sons”. Only one of the names of these sons is provided:Sæmingr, a king of Norway. Two stanzas are presented by the skald Eyvindr skaldaspillir in reference. In the first stanza, Skadi is described as a jötunn and a “fair maiden”. A portion of the second stanza is missing. The second stanza reads:
Of sea-bones,and sons manythe ski-goddessgat with Óthin

Skadi, in Norse Mythology, the giant wife of the sea god Njörd. In order to avenge the death of her father, the giant Thiazi, Skadi took up arms and went to attack the rival tribe of the gods (the Aesir) in Asgard, home of the gods. The Aesir, wanting to appease her anger, offered her the choice of one of their number for a husband, with the stipulation that she choose a god by his legs (or feet) alone. She chose Njord, thinking that he was the fair god Balder; their marriage failed because Njord preferred to live by the sea, and Skadi was happier in her father’s home in the mountains (Thrymheim).

"Hateful for me are the mountains,
I was not long there,
only nine nights.
The howling of the wolves
sounded ugly to me
after the song of the swans.”

Skadi responded:

"Sleep I could not
on the sea beds
for the screeching of the bird.
That gull wakes me
when from the wide sea
he comes each morning.”

In some sources, Skadi was known as the goddess of snowshoes. Another tradition relates that Skadi later married the god Odin and bore him sons. And yet another that she after that married Ull. The god of justice and dueling.

In chapter 8 of the Heimskringla book Ynglinga saga, Skadi appears in an euhumerized account. This account details that Skadi had once married Njord but that she would not have sex with him, and that later Skadi married Odin. Skadi and Odin had “many sons”. Only one of the names of these sons is provided:Sæmingr, a king of Norway. Two stanzas are presented by the skald Eyvindr skaldaspillir in reference. In the first stanza, Skadi is described as a jötunn and a “fair maiden”. A portion of the second stanza is missing. The second stanza reads:

Of sea-bones,
and sons many
the ski-goddess
gat with Óthin